CAP BADGES OF THE CANADIAN ARMY
(Infantry Corps)
1939-1945

In many ways, a cap badge was a soldier's most prized possession; in 1939 it was often the only identifying insignia a soldier wore.  Cap badges, like other metal insignia, were approved by General Order.   In the main, badges for Other Ranks were made of brass, though many units used copper or white metal instead.  Some badges were "battle bronzed", or coated with a dull brown finish.  Officers in some regiments wore the same badge as the men, though in many the pattern was similar but the badge was chromed or even purchased in sterling silver (some of which were polished, some were left oxidize and darken).  A few organizations had completely seperate patterns of badge for their officers.

Coloured cloth backings were often formally agreed on for cap badges, but not always seen in practice.  More information on cloth backings is given on the seperate pages for headdress.

Corps Badge Variations Notes
The Algonquin Regiment


Info provided by Clem Beauchesne, Algonquin Veteran's Association and Bill Alexander.

White metal and monel badges, showing the difference in finish.
algoonsx.jpg (11090 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Alexander

Officers had sterling silver and frosted silver badges, though these were in short supply and many wore the Other Ranks (white metal) badge. There were two variations of the Algonquin badge, one in a material called monel metal (a nickel alloy, used upon the fact that the regiment was, from 1920 through 1936, representing the Sudbury area), the second type was the standard white metal. Some King's Crown badges are marked Scully and some are marked Birks, as Scully had subcontracted the manufacture to other companies. Both types (monel and white metal, Scully and Birks) were worn during the war (one contract was made in 39-40 for the monel before it became unavailable, after a  disagreement between the Sault Ste Marie and Sudbury Regiment who had claimed the right to the monel and the Algonquins.)  The monel badge is much harder metal than white metal, it is magnetic, and has a bit of a blue-ish tinge.(when compared to the white metal.) The monel badges are harder to find todya than the white metal badge.

The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught's Own Rifles)  bcr1x.jpg (11287 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
bcr2.jpg (10339 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
The Calgary Highlanders

Info provided by Lieutenant Brian Kng and Maj(ret) Donny Munro, The Calgary Highlanders Museum
Copper and whi Other Ranks version
capchcop.jpg (16680 bytes)
At left, brass version (with white metal overlay).
 
At right, Officer's cap badge in sterling silver.

capchb.jpg (32560 bytes)calhioff.jpg (7364 bytes)
Battle Bronzed badges seem to have been commonly worn by Other Ranks after mobilization.

Silver badges (either chromed, nickle plated, or sterling silver) were worn by officers, the RSM, pipers and drummers.
The Calgary Regiment (Tank)
Info provided by Bill Ellis
capcalg.jpg (20746 bytes)
The regiment was forced to change this badge after the war, as it is not permissible for anything to be superimposed over the Crown (in this case, the offending sunburst was removed).  The badge is modelled on the coat of arms of the City of Calgary.

Variant badge with the types of metal reversed.
capcalv.jpg (15359 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis

caltank.jpg (53233 bytes)
Badges and image courtesy Dwayne Hordij

The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa (M.G.) capcam.jpg (78580 bytes)
Though a 1945 photo does show a Cameron of Ottawa officer wearing the blue hackle of the Imperal Camerons, the regiment did not officially start wearing them until the 1950s.  It is possible that a small number of individual Camerons may have taken the hackles into wear; they were worn in conjunction with the cap badge.

camerons.jpg (25230 bytes)
Badges and images courtesy Bill Ellis 

The Canadian Scottish Regiment (M.G.)

Info supplied by Robert Russell, Curator, The Canadian Scottish Regiment (Princess Mary's) Museum.

Other Ranks pattern badge, First Battalion, in white metal.
capscoto.jpg (76876 bytes)
 

Fine example of an early strike badge.
csco.jpg (14805 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis

Variations on the cap badge as worn by the home service battalions of the Canadian Scottish.
cscotrbak.jpg (20828 bytes)
Photo courtesy Robert Russell, Curator, The Canadian Scottish Regiment (Princess Mary's) Museum.

The Second and Third Battalions wore a similar pattern badge as the First, but the corners on the St. Andrew's Cross were rounded off, in order to distinguish them.    Other Ranks wore badges in white metal, while officers wore sterling silver.   Some were hallmarked, but all sterling badges were of a superior strike to the other ranks' badges.

At right is a Second Battalion badge, before the alterations were made to the St. Andrew's Cross.  According to Bill Ellis:  An "original" issue badge to the 2nd Bn Canadian Scottish,(prior to the battalion alteration to the St Andrews Cross)  Note, the filled in area in the center of the badge, rare piece here.

2scot.jpg (28969 bytes)
The Cape Breton Highlanders Three varieties;  with buckled annulus, without buckled annulus, and white metal over bronze.  Badge at far left also has "Canada" insrcibed on base of crown (not visible in this scan) which was apparently ordered removed from later badges along with the buckled annulus.  The 48th Highlanders were also ordered to remove the buckled annulus from their badges.capes.jpg (38741 bytes)
Badges and images courtesy Bill Ellis 
The Carleton and York Regiment capcyr1.jpg (10422 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis

Other Ranks' brass and white metal
capcyr2.jpg (10580 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis

Officer's bronze and white metal
carl.jpg (58586 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Dwayne Hordij

The Edmonton Fusiliers (MG)  capedmf1.jpg (11608 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
capedmf2.jpg (10880 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
The Edmonton Regiment capedm.jpg (46204 bytes) edmn.jpg (5730 bytes)  ledm.jpg (11296 bytes)
Badges and images courtesy Bill Ellis
The Edmonton Regiment was renamed "The Loyal Edmonton Regiment" in 1943 to reflect its affiliation with the Loyal Regiment of the British Army.
The Elgin Regiment capelgin.jpg (80252 bytes)
capelgin1.jpg (13522 bytes) elgvoid.jpg (8979 bytes)

Badges and images courtesy Bill Ellis

The Essex Scottish (White metal version)
capessc.jpg (68892 bytes)
(Brass version)
capesb.jpg (36866 bytes)
48th Highlanders of Canada

Info supplied by Art Johnson, Associate Curator, the 48th Highlanders Museum as well as RSM Bill Elms (via Bill Ellis).

The buckle style cap badge was worn until 1940 by other ranks in white metal and silver plate or sterling silver for officers.
silbadge.jpg (28716 bytes)
Courtesy Art Johnson, Associate Curator, 48th Highlanders Museum

The badge below is  the later pattern badge with striated numerals, which seems to have been a feature of earlier (Canadian production?) badges.
cap48s.jpg (12679 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis

cap48.jpg (59808 bytes)
Brass ORs badgecap48b.jpg (14493 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis

The Regiment had been advised in 1925 that the buckle was not appropriate for inclusion in their cap badge and was ordered to remove it.  Existing stocks were permitted to be worn out, and the version with the diamonds does not appear to have been issued until 1940.

The Halifax Rifles (Bronze badge)
caphal.jpg (80836 bytes)
(White metal badge)
caphal1.jpg (18153 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment

Info supplied by Major R. D. Bradford, 1st Canadian Division HQ.

caphast.jpg (78516 bytes)  

 

All ranks wore the stamped brass badge.  By tradition in this regiment, officers and men wear the same badge.  In 1941 a move was made by the battalion in Britain to adopt an officer's cloth badge, but the RSM at the time fought against it.  Some versions were produced and may have been worn by individual officers.  One example of a badge modified by having the area around the stag's head cut out has been found, but this represents the exception to the rule.
The Highland Light Infantry of Canada caphli.jpg (62668 bytes)

(Vaulted ORs variant)
caphliv.jpg (15037 bytes)


caphlio.jpg (19223 bytes)

Badges and images courtesy Bill Ellis

All ranks wore a white metal cap badge.

Irish Fusiliers of Canada (Vancouver Regiment) if1.jpg (5483 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
if2.jpg (7837 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
According to collector Bill Ellis, legend has it that only NCOs wore the badge with the crown; Privates wore the grenade only.
The Irish Regiment of Canada (M.G.) capiri.jpg (77044 bytes)
The Kent Regiment (M.G.) capkent.jpg (45056 bytes)
(Officer's badge)
capkentoff.jpg (10712 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
The King's Own Rifles (M.G.) capkor.jpg (9656 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
The Lake Superior Regiment

Info supplied by Captain D.K. Ratz, Historical Officer, LSSR.
 lak.jpg (14793 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
(Officer's bi-metal version)
caplsr.jpg (60716 bytes)

Some officers variations did exist, such as older badges being cut out around the letters of the monogram.  Designs for a new cap badge in 1944 were never implemented, causing some confusion among collectors.

The Middlesex and Huron Regiment capmidd.jpg (12218 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis

capmidland.jpg (16969 bytes)Officer's cap badge in bronze

Bill Ellis notes:  "I cannot explain the mystery behind this mule, note erroneous crown on badge. I am told that it is a legitimate issue. It is a cast,officer quality badge.maker marked Scully Ltd, Montreal"
capmiddo.jpg (13551 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis

The North Nova Scotia Highlanders (M.G.)

capnns1.jpg (15098 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis

Other Ranks badge, "HIGHLANDERS" in full,  without the "M.G." designation
capnns.jpg (65544 bytes)

Officers badge with mother of pearl background, and green and blue enamelled thistle.
nnsoff.jpg (67596 bytes)
Photo courtesy Ray Coulson, Nova Scotia Highlanders Regimental Museum

Other Ranks wore badges in white metal. In 1941, new cap badges were issued deleting the "M.G." suffix from the unit title, and expanding the phrase "HIGHRS" to read "HIGHLANDERS.

Other Ranks badge, "HIGHLANDERS" abbreviated,  without the "M.G." designation
capnns2.jpg (13193 bytes)

Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis

Officers badge with mother of pearl background, and green and blue enamelled thistle.
capnns3.jpg (15524 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis

capnns4.jpg (17675 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis

The North Shore (New Brunswick) Regiment capnb.jpg (57964 bytes)
The Ontario Regiment (Tank) capon.jpg (10046 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
The Oxford Rifles
capox1.jpg (11163 bytes) capox2.jpg (8992 bytes)
Badges and images courtesy Bill Ellis
The Pacific Coast Militia Rangers

Info supplied by Bill Ellis.

Other Ranks badge - note the holes through which the badge was stitched to the cap - there was no other method of attachment provided..
cappcmr.jpg (5693 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
Two other other varieties of this badge were issued; these both lacked stitch holes and instead had cotter pin and lug fasteners.   The badge at left has had lugs soldered onto it, likely unofficially, in order to accept the cotter pin backing.
The Perth Regiment (M.G.)  capperth.jpg (11542 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
 capperth2.jpg (11889 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
The Prince Edward Island Highlanders cappei1.jpg (16110 bytes)cappei2.jpg (16357 bytes)
Badges and images courtesy Bill Ellis
The Prince of Wales' Rangers (Peterborough Regiment) (M.G.) cappwr.jpg (14626 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
Officer's Badge
pwroff.jpg (55545 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
The Prince Rupert Regiment (M.G.) cappr.jpg (9668 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
The Princess Louise Fusiliers (M.G.) capplf.jpg (62296 bytes)
The Princess of Wales' Own Regiment (M.G.) cappwor.jpg (54552 bytes)
Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry capppcli.jpg (55452 bytes) Officers badge - reversed metals and cast rather than struck.
 ppcli0.jpg (7249 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders of Canada  capqoch.jpg (17499 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
The Queen's Own Rifles of Canada

Info provided by Captain Peter Simundson, Curator, the QOR Museum.

capqor.jpg (74456 bytes)

All ranks wore unplated white metal badges.  Some officers may have had wire embroidered badges, though information on these is sketchy.  They were probably not very common and worn, if at all, very late in the war.

Le Regiment de Chauteauguay (Mit)  chaut.jpg (10094 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
Le Regiment de Gaspe-Bonaventure capfst.jpg (7973 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis

This regiment was a redesignation of the 3rd Bn Le Fusiliers Du St Laurent.  Bill Ellis tells me that he was told some years ago that they wore the brass version of the "Fusiliers Du St Laurent" badge.   There is no evidence at present that a seperate badge ever existed for Le Regiment de Gaspe-Bonaventure.

Le Regiment de Levis  levis.jpg (26832 bytes)
Badge at far right is that worn by Other Ranks.  Badge at centre is an Officers example, with the original mint luster worn off.  The far left example is the 1928 issue.

Badges and image courtesy Bill Ellis 
Le Regiment de Maisonneuve capmais.jpg (73072 bytes) Other ranks with buckled annulus, without buckled annulus, and Officer's.
maisies.jpg (42301 bytes)
Badges and image courtesy Bill Ellis 
Le Regiment de Montmagny capmont.jpg (74736 bytes)
Le Regiment de Quebec (Mit)  capque.jpg (10127 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
Le Regiment de St. Hyacinthe  caphya.jpg (11182 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
Le Regiment du Saguenay  capsag.jpg (15359 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
The Regina Rifle Regiment caprrr1.jpg (8874 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
caprrr2.jpg (10557 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
The Rocky Mountain Rangers caprmra.jpg (71324 bytes)
The Royal Canadian Regiment caprcr.jpg (50924 bytes)
The Royal Hamilton Light Infantry (Wentworth Regiment) caprhli.jpg (52472 bytes)

Officer's badge at right.

Artifact and image courtesy Dwayne Hordij.

rhlioff.jpg (277369 bytes)
The Royal Montreal Regiment (M.G.) caprmr.jpg (72896 bytes)
 

Officer's badge at right.

Artifact and image courtesy Dwayne Hordij.

caprmroff.jpg (35728 bytes)
The Royal Regiment of Canada Bronze version
caprrc1.jpg (14510 bytes)
Brass version
caprrcb.jpg (75304 bytes)

All ranks wore a bi-metal version of either brass or bronze with a white metal overlay in the centre.

Royal 22e Regiment cap221.jpg (15431 bytes) cap22.jpg (64260 bytes)
A particularly well worn badge
The Royal Winnipeg Rifles caprwr.jpg (84144 bytes) (Officer's sterling silver badge)
caprwr1.jpg (17644 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis
Officers wore sterling silver badges; some were left to oxidize, others were polished. 

Other Ranks wore white metal badges.

The Saskatoon Light Infantry (M.G.)

Info supplied by C. Keith Inches, Curator, Saskatchewan Military Museum.

capsli.jpg (79904 bytes)  

Officers wore sterling silver badges while Other Ranks wore white metal badges.

The Seaforth Highlanders of Canada (Official pattern)
seaforth.jpg (16965 bytes)
Three piece officer's badge.  Sometimes only the stag's head was worn.
 seaoff.jpg (41223 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Dwayne Hordij
The cap badges supplied to the Seaforths by the Government before and during the war did not correspond to the "official" pattern, and the Regiment had to have the badges privately manufactured in order to conform both to General Orders, and to the badge worn by the Imperial Seaforths.  The "L" and coronet are often missing from the badge in period photos
The South Alberta Regiment

Some officers also wore metal wire cloth badges.

The South Saskatchewan Regiment

Info supplied by C. Keith Inches, Curator, Saskatchewan Military Museum and Bill Ellis.

capssr.jpg (71804 bytes)

ssr1.jpg (15466 bytes)
ssr2x.jpg (17356 bytes)
Badges and images courtesy Bill Ellis
All-brass badge at left may be a test strike, though Bill notes it has factory attached lugs, leading one to presume it was intended to be worn.
Other ranks wore bi-metal badges of brass and white metal.

Some officers wore these as well, with some of them painting the sunburst brown.   Other officers opted bi-metal badges in bronze and silver.
The Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders

Info provided by Donn Fowler, SDG Veteran's Association and Bill Ellis.

First Patterncapsdg1.jpg (46400 bytes)

Second Pattern
capsdg2.jpg (53036 bytes)

First Pattern badge
(cast Officer's version)

capsdgco.jpg (11862 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis

Officers Second Pattern badge; this example has been struck rather than cast
sdgoff.jpg (12592 bytes)
Badge and image courtesy Bill Ellis

All ranks wore the first pattern badge in nickle plate.  In 1941, the second pattern badge was introduced and issued.  Of concern to the regiment was the fact that the Raven on the Rock icon was not included in the original design.

Some men may have worn privately purchase chromed badges, while most officers invested in Sterling Silver badges, some polished, and some left to oxidize and darken.