Organization

Canadian Army

Domestic Military Organization

Headquarters

Militia HQ

Canadian Forces HQ

National Defence HQ (NDHQ)

Political Institutions

Dept. of Militia & Defence

►►Minister of Militia & Defence

►►Militia Council

Department of National Defence

►►Minister of National Defence

►►Chiefs of Staff Committee

Reorganizations

1902-1904 Dundonald Reforms
1920 Otter Committee
1936 Reorganization
1954 Kennedy Board
1957 Anderson Report
1964 Suttie Commission
1968 Unification
1995 Special Commission

Organizational Corps/Branches

1900-1968 Organizational Corps
1968-2000 Branches

Field Forces

1914-1919  

Canadian Expeditionary Force
CEF Regional Affiliations

Territorial Reinforcement Regts.

1919

Canadian Siberian Exped Force

1939-1940 (1945) 

Canadian Active Service Force

1945

Canadian Army Pacific Force

1950-1953

Canadian Army Special Force

Field Force Formations

1914-1918  
Canadian Corps
1st Div | 2nd Div | 3rd Div | 4th Div 5th Div
1939-1945

1st Canadian Army

1st Canadian Corps

2nd Canadian Corps

Atlantic Command

Pacific Command
1st Infantry Division
2nd Infantry Division

3rd Infantry Division

4th (Armoured) Division
5th (Armoured) Division
6th Division 

7th Division 

8th Division 
1st Armoured Brigade
2nd Armoured Brigade
3rd Armoured Brigade
3rd Tank Brigade

 1950-1953
1 Com Div | 25 Inf Bde

Foreign Headquarters

Allied Forces HQ (AFHQ)

►►15th Army Group

►►►8th Army

SHAEF

►►21st Army Group

►►►2nd British Army

Special Forces

1st Canadian Para Battalion

First Special Service Force

Pacific Coast Militia Rangers

Canadian Rangers

Special Air Service (SAS) Coy

The Canadian Airborne Regt

Organizational Formations

Reserve Bdes - 1941-1945

13 Cdn Infantry Training Bde

14 Cdn Infantry Training Bde

27th Canadian Brigade

1 CMBG

2 CMBG

3 CMBG

4 CMBG

5 CMBG

1st Cdn Division (1954-1958)

1st Cdn Division (1988-2000)

Special Service Force

Auxiliary Services
Alliances

1914-1918 Triple Alliance
1939-1945 Allies
1949-1999 NATO

Veteran's Organizations

Defence Associations

Canadian Cavalry Association
Canadian Infantry Association
Intelligence Branch Association

National Defence Emp Assoc
RCAC (Cavalry)
RCA Association
RCOC Association
Union of Nat Def Employees

Veteran's Associations

ANAVETS
Royal Canadian Legion

Supplementary Order of Battle

Unit Listings by year

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Unit Listings by Corps/Branch

Armoured Units 1940-1945

Cdn Dental Corps 1939-1945
Cdn Intelligence Corps 1942-45

Cdn Provost Corps 1940-1945

Infantry Battalions 1939-1945

RCOC 1939-1945

5th Canadian Division

The 5th Canadian Division refers to two organizations raised during the 20th Century. This article refers to the division raised as a formation in the First World War.

The 5th Canadian Division began assembling in Britain in Jan 1917 from troops in the United Kingdom. The desire had been to create a second Canadian corps, to eventually consists of the 4th, 5th, and 6th divisions. In the event, this never happened; the proposed 6th Division never reaching organizational stage and the while the 5th Division did serve as a local defence force in the UK, increasing casualties on the Continent in 1917 resulted in reorganizations. The British Expeditionary Force (BEF), the main body of the British Army in France, reduced the number of battalions in each infantry brigade from four to three in Jan 1918. These brigades, while easier to reinforce with the temporary surplus of manpower the reduction caused, were weaker. Canada refused to follow suit.

Canadian authorities argued that keeping the larger brigades would give them more offensive punch, and after the spectacular victory at Vimy in Apr 1917, the Canadian Corps was used increasingly as an offensive formation. However, it became increasingly obvious that the second proposed corps was unfeasible, even with the introduction of conscription in early 1918, as not only would more infantry units be needed, but all the associated service and support troops, staff officers, and other logistics required to run a second corps. Finally, the creation of a second corps would have removed one battle tested division from a successful corps headquarters and placed it in an inexperienced formation.

The 5th Division was therefore disbanded in Feb 1918 at the decision of the Overseas Minister, with troops going to bolster formations in France; Canadian thinking was proved correct and the oversized corps with four divisions provided much offensive punch in several battles in 1918, with their relatively over strength infantry brigades. Each infantry battalion also had its establishment increased by 100 men, and 4,800 soldiers of the 5th Division were used to overcome this shortfall. Engineer and machine gun companies were also transplanted into the Canadian Corps; in May 1918 the divisional MG companies of the Canadian Machine Gun Corps were able to add additional companies.

While the shortage of infantry reinforcements had been acute after costly battles in 1917 such as Passchendaele, the situation with respect to artillery was not as acute. The entire divisional artillery of the 5th Division had actually been sent to France as corps troops in Aug 1916, gaining experience and lending their firepower to the Canadian Corps.

Normal supply and transport units had not yet been attached to the division by the time of disbandment.

Order of Battle

13th Canadian Brigade

  • 128th (Moose Jaw) Battalion. Feb 1917 - May 1917. Absorbed by the 15th Canadian Reserve Battalion.

  • 134th (48th Highlanders) Battalion. Feb 1917 - Feb 1918. Absorbed by the 12th Canadian Reserve Battalion.

  • 160th Battalion. Feb 1917 - Feb 1918. Absorbed by the 4th Canadian Reserve Battalion.

  • 164th (Halton and Dufferin) Battalion. May 1917 - Apr 1918. Absorbed by the 8th Canadian Reserve Battalion.

  • 202nd Battalion. Feb 1917 - May 28, 1918. Absorbed by the 9th Canadian Reserve Battalion.

  • 208th Battalion. May 1917 - Jan 3, 1918. Absorbed by the 2nd and 3rd Canadian Reserve Battalions.

14th Canadian Brigade

  • 125th Battalion. Feb 1917 - Apr 16, 1918. Absorbed by the 8th Canadian Reserve Battalion.

  • 150th (Carabiniers Mont Royal) Battalion. Feb 1917 - 15 Feb 1918. Absorbed by the 6th Canadian Reserve Battalion.

  • 156th (Leeds and Grenville) Battalion. Feb 1917 - Feb 15, 1918. Absorbed by the 6th Canadian Reserve Battalion.

  • 161st Battalion. Feb 1917 - 15 Feb 1918. Absorbed by the 4th Canadian Reserve Battalion.

15th Canadian Brigade

  • 104th (New Brunswick) Battalion. Feb 1917 - 15 Feb 1918. Absorbed by the 13th Canadian Reserve Battalion.

  • 119th (Algoma) Battalion. Feb 1917 - 16 Apr 1918. Absorbed by the 8th Canadian Reserve Battalion.

  • 185th (Cape Breton Highlanders) Battalion. Feb 1917 - 15 Feb 1918. Absorbed by the 17th Canadian Reserve Battalion.

  • 198th (Canadian Buffs) Battalion. Apr 1917 9 Mar 1918. Absorbed by the 3rd Canadian Reserve Battalion.

  • 199th (Duchess of Connaught's Own Irish Canadian Rangers) Battalion. Feb 1917 - Apr 1917. Absorbed by the 23rd Canadian Reserve Battalion.

Attached Troops

  • 164th (Halton and Dufferin) Battalion. Feb 1917 - May 1917. To the 13th Canadian Brigade;

  • 198th (Canadian Buffs) Battalion. Feb 1917 - Apr 1917. To the 15th Canadian Brigade;

  • 208th Battalion. February 1917 - May 1917. To the 13th Canadian Brigade;

  • 236th (MacLean Highlanders) Battalion. Feb 1917 - May 1917. Disbanded on 13 Mar 1918.


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